Five Minute Friday: season

 

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What do you do with Christmas, on a chilly Friday morning, when the sun gathers itself into a point on a car windshield and shoots through the coffee shop window into your eyes to dazzle and delight?

What do you do with it, listening to carols and washing cups in your kitchen with windows beaded with the night’s condensation?

What do you do with it, stitching green Christmas trees and gold sequins onto red felt?

What do you do with it, when your grandpa’s heart has him in the hospital far away, and a boy who used to be in your children’s choir started chemo this week?

Where do the garlands and lights downtown meet the people with ports and IVs and monitors? Where do they meet the women enslaved by ISIS? Where do they meet ugliness and grief and pain that tinsel and cookies can’t comfort?

Have we got it wrong, with gaudy celebrations and songs? Or is it that this season is at its heart exactly about meeting those pains — about the only thing that can heal those wounds — an extraordinary event demanding extraordinary celebration.

Meet it with awe and reverence: God walking in human feet, come to bear human woes. And meet it with loud songs of joy: whosoever believeth in Him shall not perish, but have everlasting life.

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Writing more than five minutes, but still linking up with Kate Motaung on her prompt, season. The “season” button above takes you to her site.

©2015 by Stacy Crouch

5 thoughts on “Five Minute Friday: season

  1. Tara says:

    Stacy, so much THIS: “Meet it with awe and reverence: God walking in human feet, come to bear human woes. And meet it with loud songs of joy: whosoever believeth in Him shall not perish, but have everlasting life.” Thank You for this. Visiting from FMF where we are neighbors.

  2. This is beautiful! I’ve been pondering kind of the same thing the last few days. This is a time for worship and reflecting on what God has done. Thanks for sharing!

  3. It is in the holding of hands and the singing of carols and keeping the songs alive regardless of how bad the worst is or can be that keeps hope alive for what we believe can be.
    I can promise that the person with the port, the friend facing chemo, those who suffer, need the song, the traditions of Christmas and the hope that comes with remembering a baby Jesus’ birth. We pass through this life so fast, like the falling snow on this page and we must not turn away from all the pain, fears and tears. It exists, but we exist with joy and love in our hearts. It is the act of holding on, singing, sharing that joy and love that makes the difference and how that difference can affect others, especially those in need.

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